Canadian Aboriginal Art And Culture: Huron, hardcover ed

$0.00

Canadian Aboriginal Art And Culture: Huron is one of the titles in Smartbook Media’s series, Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture, published in 2019. Each title in this series provides factual information about a First Nation and is designed for grades five and six. Authors Christine Webster and John Willis explain how the French identified this First Nation as Huron referencing the bristle-like hairstyle of Wendat men. The people called themselves Wendat, meaning people of the peninsula.

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Treaty Tales, 3 volume set in French, hardcover

$39.95

Treaty Tales 3 volume set in French contains Treaty Tales Volume One La poignée de main et le calumet (The Handshake and the Pipe); Treaty Tales Volume Two L’amitié (The Friendship); and Treaty tales Volume Three Les traités nous concernent tous  (We are All Treaty People) produced by Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre.

Price: $39.95

Lost Harvests: Prairie Indian Reserve Farmers and Government Policy, 2nd edtion, paperback

$34.95

Lost Harvests: Prairie Indian Reserve Farmers and Government Policy, 2nd edition by Sarah Carter now includes a new introduction and is based on the original 1990 edition of this book and with the same name. Lost Harvests is about the history of the Plains Nations west of the Red River settlement and farming the prairies in the 19th century. This work is unique because in general the author states that First Nations were excluded from the history of farming and discussions on their capability to farm.

Price: $34.95

Train, The, paperback ed. Available in March 2020

$17.95

The Train is written by Jodie Callaghan, a Mi’gmaq woman from Listuguj First Nation in Gespegewa’gi near Quebec. The Train is illustrated by Georgia Lesley. This is story of a young girl, Ashley who is slowly walking back from school when she meets her Uncle. He is sad. He tells Ashley his story of first going to residential school and the important lesson of knowing where you come from. This story is colourfully illustrated yet invokes the sadness that Ashley and her Uncle feel. It is also descriptive with a short glossary of Mig’maq words.

Price: $17.95

When A Ghost Talks, Listen, hardcover ed.

$25.95

When A Ghost Talks, Listen is the sequel to ‘How I Became A Ghost’ by Tim Tingle, an Oklahoma Choctaw storyteller and award-winning author. Tim Tingle’s great-great-grandfather walked the Trail of Tears in 1835 and this trilogy is inspired by Tim Tingle walking the trail and from recordings of stories of tribal elders. The first book in the series, How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story, sets the scene in a story about the Choctaw removal process from the Choctaw homelands in Mississippi to the Oklahoma Reservation during the 1800s through the eyes of 10-year-old Isaac.

Price: $25.95

Gii-bi-gaachiiyaanh: When I Was a Child, spiral bound, black and white edition

$25.00

Gii-bi-gaachiiyaanh: When I Was a Child written by Ojibwe language teacher Shirley Williams is a dual language picture book about Shirley's childhood memories. Told in English and Ojibwe languages the memories of her father's gentle teachings about listening during a fishing trip will appeal to all readers. Both of Shirley's parents wanted their daughter to observe and listen to the world around her in order to understand her culture.

Price: $25.00

Bawaajimo, paperback ed.

$36.88

Bawaajimo, A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature by Margaret Noodin, discusses Anishinaabe language and literature through the works of four writers representing a range of contemporary Anishinaabe literature: Louise Erdrich, Jim Northrup, Basil Johnston and Gerald Vizenor, who share a world view, a common cultural, linguistic and literary heritage. Their works reflect patterns of identity, conscious survival, universal life and stirred thoughts respectively.

Price: $36.88

Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not A Number, Ojibwe and English, paperback ed.

$14.95

Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not A Number is the first children's picture book by Ojibwe educator Jenny Kay Dupuis from Nipissing First Nation in Ontario. This book has been translated into Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe), Nbisiing dialect by Muriel Sawyer and Geraldine McLeod and contributions by Tory Fisher. Dupuis retells the story of her grandmother Irene Couchie Dupuis taken to residential school at the age of eight in 1928.

Price: $14.95

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