Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance, paperback ed. Available March 2021.

$25.95

Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance is written by Nick Estes, a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and co-founder of Red Nation. Our History is the Future, is the story of a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, which was initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. This protest grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century.

Price: $25.95

When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry, paperback ed.

$25.95

When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry is edited by  Joy Harjo of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and was named the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States in 2019; with Leanne Howe, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Jennifer Elise Foerster, a member of the Muscogee Nation; and contributing editors. This anthology gathers the work of more than 160 poets, representing nearly 100 indigenous nations.

Price: $25.95

In Search of April Raintree 25th ed, paper edition

$19.95

In Search of April Raintree is the story of two Métis sisters growing up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. After the girls are removed from their family, they are sent to separate foster homes. Métis writer Beatrice Culleton Mosionier recounts their struggle with loss, violence, racism, and search for identity in this moving narrative. This novel has become an important text in recent Canadian literature. This new critical edition includes the complete text of the novel and ten original essays.

Price: $19.95

Angel Wing Splash Pattern, paper ed.

$20.00

First published in 2000, Angel Wing Splash Pattern is where Richard Van Camp’s love of the short story began. In these stories he demonstrates the range of his talent and the pursuit of excellence in his craft as a writer and storyteller. Richard Van Camp is a proud Tłįchϙ Dene from Fort Smith, NWT. In Angel Wing Splash Pattern Richard Van Camp celebrates life in northern Canada where the stories are playful, moving, and starkly honest in their portrayal of contemporary Indigenous life. There is pain in these stories and there is loss.

Price: $20.00

I Place You Into the Fire, paper ed.

$18.95

I Place You Into the Fire by Rebecca Thomas, Mi'kmaw spoken-word artist and author of I'm Finding My Talk shows that three similarly shaped Mi'kmaw words have drastically different meanings: kesalul means "I love you"; kesa'lul means "I hurt you"; and ke'sa'lul means "I put you into the fire." In this poetry collection, readers will feel Rebecca Thomas's deep love, pain, and frustration and loss.

Price: $18.95

This Place: 150 Years Retold, Teacher Guide, Spiral Bound

$19.99

This Place: 150 Years Retold includes a variety of historical and contemporary stories that highlight important moments in Indigenous and Canadian history. It introduces students to the unique demographic, historical, and cultural legacy of Indigenous communities, and explores acts of sovereignty and resiliency.

Price: $19.99

As Long As Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, from Colonization to Standing Rock, paper ed.

$22.00

As Long As Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, from Colonization to Standing Rock by Dina Gilio-Whitaker, a member of Colville Confederated Tribes, explores the fraught history of treaty violations, struggles for food and water security, and protection of sacred sites, while highlighting the important leadership of Indigenous women in this centuries-long struggle or Indigenous environmental justice.

Price: $22.00

Black Water: Family, legacy, and Blood Memory, a Memoir, hardcover ed.

$32.99

Black Water is David Alexander Robertson's autobiography. The son of a Cree father and a non-Indigenous mother, David A. Robertson was raised with virtually no knowledge or understanding of his family’s Indigenous roots. His father, Don, spent his early childhood on a  trapline in the bush northeast of Norway House, Manitoba, where his first teach was the land. When his family was moved permanently to a nearby reserve, Don was not permitted to speak Cree at school unless in secret with his friends and lost the knowledge he had been gifted while living on his trapline.

Price: $32.99

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