Long Run, The, paper ed

$13.95

The Long Run by award-winning Abenaki author Joseph Bruchac is the most recent release by 7th Generations Books in the PathFinders Series. This series is ideal for reluctant readers interested in realistic and action-filled, linear plots written by Native American and First Nation authors. This young adult fictional account a seventeen year old Passamaquoddy youth who runs away from the Seattle homeless shelter back to his elderly grandparents in Maine.

Price: $13.95

Restoring the Chain of Friendship: British Policy and the Indians of the Great Lakes, 1783-1815, paper ed

$53.95

Restoring the Chain of Friendship: British Policy and the Indians of the Great Lakes, 1783-1815 is a recent title by historian Timothy Willig of Onondaga Community College in Syracuse. His approach to the period is to examine the British policy to First Nations in the Great Lakes region following the American Revolution to the War of 1812. The focus of the thesis is the British policy toward First Nations at its Great Lakes agencies at Fort St. Joseph, Fort Amherstburg, and Fort George. The first chapter examines the Covenant Chain of Friendship over time.

Price: $53.95

Thomas Indian School and the Irredeemable Children of New York, The, paper ed

$48.00

The Thomas Indian School and the "Irredeemable" Children of New York is an important history that significantly contributes to the history of settler colonial schooling by documenting a distinctively different kind of Indian School: non-federal, state run, horrifically committed to the idea of the ‘irredeemable’ Indian child. K. Tsianina Lomawaima

Price: $48.00

Rotinonshonni: A Traditional Iroquoian History Through the Eyes of Teharonhia:wako and Sawiskera, The, paper ed

$40.00

The Rotinonshonni: A Traditional Iroquoian History Through the Eyes of Teharonhia:wako and Sawiskera by Mohawk scholar Brian Rice offers a comprehensive history based on the oral traditions of the Rotinonshonni Longhouse People, also known as the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois. Drawing upon J. N. B. Hewitt’s translation and the oral presentations of Cayuga Elder Jacob Thomas, Rice records the Iroquois creation story, the origin of Iroquois clans, the Great Law of Peace, the European invasion, and the life of Handsome Lake.

Price: $40.00

Who Are These People Anyway?, paper ed

$31.95

Who Are These People Anyway? told by Chief Irving Powless Jr. of the Onondaga Nation is a valuable addition to the understanding of Haudenosaunee worldview. Edited by Lesley Forrester the volume in Syracuse University Press the Iroquois and Their Neighbors series offers readers a fine example of Iroquois oral history recorded as a collection of Haudenosaunee teachings. Irving Powless Jr. has been a chief of the Beaver Clan of the Onondaga Nation since 1964.

Price: $31.95

Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau: Art and the Colonial Narrative in the Canadian Media, paper ed

$27.95

Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau: Art and the Colonial Narrative in the Canadian Media examines the complex identities assigned to Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau. Carmen L. Robertson, a Lakota/Scottish associate professor of art history at University of Regina, charts both the colonial attitudes and the stereotypes directed at Morrisseau and other Indigenous artists in Canada’s national press. Robertson also examines Morrisseau’s own shaping of his image.

Price: $27.95

Creating Colonial Pasts: History, Memory, and Commemoration in Southern Ontario, 1860-1980, paper ed

$35.95

Creating Colonial Pasts: History, Memory, and Commemoration in Southern Ontario, 1860-1980 explores the creation of history and memory in Southern Ontario through the experience of its inhabitants, especially those who took an active role in the preservation and writing of Ontario’s colonial past: the founder of the Niagara Historical Society, Janet Carnochan; twentieth-century Six Nations historians Elliott Moses and Milton Martin; and Celia B. File, high-school teacher and historian of Mary Brant.

Price: $35.95

Eighteenth-Century Wyandot: A Clan-Based Study, The, paper ed

$48.00

The Eighteenth-Century Wyandot: A Clan-Based Study by Humber College professor John L. Steckley examines the importance of clans to the study of the history and cultural traditions of the people known as Wyandot. The Wyandot were born of two Wendat peoples encountered by the French in the first half of the seventeenth century—the otherwise named Petun and Huron—and their history is fragmented by their dispersal between Quebec, Michigan, Kansas, and Oklahoma. This book weaves these fragmented histories together, with a focus on the mid-eighteenth century.

Price: $48.00

Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture: Huron, revised edition, hardcover ed

$28.99

Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture: Huron is the 2016 revised edition in this Weigl Educational Publishers series written by Christine Webster. This 32-page volume explores the traditional and current everyday life and culture of the Wendat or Huron people by examining their unique food, clothing, art, language, homes, ceremonies, celebrations, language, storytelling, music and dance, and tools. Each topic covers the basic details of the people now known as Wendat who once lived between Lake  Simcoe and Georgian Bay in present-day Ontario and now reside In Wendake, Quebec.

Price: $28.99

Thundermaker, The, hardcover ed OUT OF PRINT

$12.95

The Thundermaker is a 32-page Mi'kmaq / English dual language picture book from Nimbus Publishing’s publication for children about the importance of thunder. In Mi’kmaw artist Alan Syliboy’s account that he wrote and illustrated begins in a time long before the world was completed. Set in a small village, the story begins with a family sitting beside their cooking fire while the mother tells a traditional story. Father is Big Thunder, mother is Giju, a renowned storyteller, and their son, Little Thunder. Each has an important role.

Price: $12.95

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