Omushkegowuk Women's Traditional Practices-LIMITED QUANTITIES


Author:
John Paul Jacasum
Grade Levels:
Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, College, University
Nation:
Cree, Subarctic
Book Type:
Paperback
Pages:
131
Publisher:
Ojibway and Cree Cultural Centre

Price:
Sale price$32.00

Description

UNAVAILABLE This title is no longer available from the publisher Omushkegowuk Women's Traditional Practices Project: Restoring the Balance is the result of an Aboriginal Healing Foundation grant. The text contains ten interviews with Omushkegowuk (James Bay Cree) elders who answer open-ended questions regarding the strength of traditional practices. The women were first interviewed in Cree in their home communities of Attawapiskat, Kashechewan, Fort Albany, Moose Factory, and Moosonee. Their responses were then translated from syllabics to English, and clarifications were made. The resulting text written in syllabics and English is a testament to the enduring cultural practices of these women. Each woman's story emphasizes the importance of traditional foods and hunting and trapping; the reliance on family and kinship; the methods of passing on traditional knowledge; and the power of spirituality. Many of the women recalled hardships encountered while living on the land, as well as the joys of living a good life in family groups. The rapidly changing lifestyles of the present generation were major concerns for the women. The goal of the project undertaken by the Ojibway and Cree Cultural Centre was to produce a resource text that would aid frontline workers in the communities. The examples set by these women should provide a wealth of information to the present generation as well as the general public. The voices of the following women are recorded in this valuable resource: Mary Okimaw, Mary Louise Metatawabin, and Mary Theresa Kataquapit from Attawapiskat; Evadney Friday and Mary Solomon from Kashechewan; Nancy Wheesk and Theresa Metat from Fort Albany; Beatrice Faries and Charlotte Koosees from Moose Factory; and Mary Lazarus from Moosonee. The strength and resourcefulness of these ten Cree women indicate that their cultural traditions will live on. Anyone interested in Native Studies and Women's Studies will find this text inspiring.

You may also like

Recently viewed