The Big Tease: A Story of Eliza Delorme and Her Cousin, Édouard Beaupré, The Willow Bunch Giant, paperback ed.

$15.00

The Big Tease written by Métis author Wilfred Burton includes a Michif translation by Norman Fleury, Michif Elder and gifted Michif storyteller. This book is illustrated by George Gingras. The Big Tease is a timeless story about teasing, which often involves family. Time with family has always been important to Métis families and in this story it is the arrival of family - cousins, aunts and uncles that sets the scene for a big tease. Like most families, there is usually at least one person who likes to tease others.

Price: $15.00

La vie autochtone au Canada: au passé, au présent et au futur : Le symbolisme dans l'art et la culture autochtone (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present, Future: Symbolism in Indigenous Arts and Culture), hardcover ed.

$32.95

La vie autochtone au Canada: au passé, au présent et au futur : Le symbolisme dans l'art et la culture autochtone (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present, Future, Symbolism in Indigenous Arts and Culture) is part of a set of 32-page books produced by Red Line Editorial for Beech Street Books and edited by Marie Pearson. Designed for elementary students from grades 4 to 7 the books offer introductions to the history of Indigenous Peoples in the story of Canada: Symbolism in Indigenous Arts and Culture has six chapters.

Price: $32.95

La vie autochtone au Canada: au passé, au présent et au futur : La rafle des années 1960 (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present, Future: Sixties Scoop), hardcover ed.

$32.95

La vie autochtone au Canada: au passé, au présent et au futur : La rafle des années 1960 (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present, Future - Sixties Scoop) is part of a set of 32-page books produced by Red Line Editorial for Beech Street Books and edited by Marie Pearson. Designed for elementary students from grades 4 to 7 the books offer introductions to the history of Indigenous Peoples in the story of Canada. Sixties Scoop by Erin Nicks has six chapters.

Price: $32.95

My First Métis Lobstick, paper ed.

$15.00

Leah Marie Dorion’s My First Métis Lobstick takes young readers back to Canada’s fur trade era by focusing on a Métis family’s preparations for a lobstick celebration and feast in the boreal forest. Through the eyes of a young boy, we see how important lobstick making and ceremony was to the Métis community. From the Great Lakes to the present-day Northwest Territories, lobstick poles—important cultural and geographical markers, which merged Cree, Ojibway, and French-Canadian traditions—dotted the landscape of our great northern boreal forest.

Price: $15.00

Métis Camp Circle: A Bison Way of Life, paper ed.

$15.00

In Métis Camp Circle: A Bison Way of Life, author and artist Leah Marie Dorion, an interdisciplinary Metis artist raised in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, transports young readers back in time when bison were the basis of Métis lifeways on the Plains. This book is translated into Michif by Norman Fleury, Michif Elder and gifted Michif storyteller. During much of the nineteenth century, bison hunting was integral to the Métis’ social, economic, and political life. As “People of the Buffalo,” the Métis were bison hunters par excellence.

Price: $15.00

Apple in the Middle, paper ed.

$26.53

Apple in the Middle by Dawn Quigley, enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa, is published by North Dakota State University Press and now in paperback. This story is set in Minnesota and the Turtle Mountain Chippewa reservation in North Dakota. Apple Starkington’s mother, a member of Turtle Mountain Chippewa, died after giving birth to her. Growing up with her father and stepmother, and living in upper middle-class suburbia, Apple feels like she doesn’t fit in. She has experienced racism at school when she was called a racial slur for someone of white and Native American descent.

Price: $26.53

Apple, Skin to the Core, paper ed.

$26.99

Apple, Skin to the Core: A Memoir in Words and Pictures, is by Eric Gansworth, an enrolled Onondaga writer and visual artist, born and raised at the Tuscarora Nation. The contents of Apple, Skin to the Core, are arranged along the theme of albums: Apple Records, The Red Album, Dog Street - Side A and Side B, Get Back and Liner Notes. Each set tells the story in words and images of his, his family, and his life on and off Dog Street. These are stories of residential schools and its impact, racism, and relationships.

Price: $26.99

The Voyageurs: Forefathers of the Métis Nation, paper ed.

$20.00

The Voyageurs: Forefathers of the Métis Nation is written by Zoey Roy, a Dene, Cree and Mé​​​tis poet from Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation in Saskatchewan. This book is translated by Michif Elder Norman Fleury, originally, from St. Lazare, Manitoba, and a gifted Michif storyteller. He speaks Michif, Cree, Anishinaabemowin, Dakota, French, and English. The Voyageurs is illustrated by Jerry Thistle, of Cree/Métis heritage. The Voyageurs tells an old story—integral to both the birth of the Métis Nation and to the development of Canada—in a new and engaging format.

Price: $20.00

Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States: Restoring Cultural Knowledge, Protecting Environments, and Regaining Health, paper ed.

$40.95

Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States: Restoring Cultural Knowledge, Protecting Environments, and Regaining Health, is edited by Devon Abbott Mihesuah, a Choctaw author and scholar; and Elizabeth Hoover, of Mohawk and Mi’kmaq ancestry. There is a foreword by Winona LaDuke, an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) member of the White Earth Nation, who is an environmentalist, economist, author, and prominent Native American activist working to restore and preserve indigenous cultures and lands.

Price: $40.95

What I Remember, What I Know: The Life of a High Arctic Exile, paper ed.

$21.95

What I Remember, What I Know: The Life of a High Arctic Exile is written by Larry Audlaluk who was born in Uugaqsiuvik, a small camp west of Inukjuak in northern Quebec. Larry Audlaluk has seen incredible changes in his lifetime. He was relocated to the High Arctic in the early 1950s with his family when he was almost three years old. They were promised a land of plenty. They discovered an inhospitable polar desert. Sharing memories both painful and joyous, Larry tells of loss, illness, and his family’s fight to return home, juxtaposed with excerpts from official government reports.

Price: $21.95

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