Tracing Ochre

University of Toronto PressSKU: 9781442628427

Author:
Polack, Fiona
Grade Levels:
College, University
Nation:
Beothuk, Innu, Mi'kmaq, Ojibwe
Book Type:
PB
Pages:
386
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press

Price:
Sale price$36.95
Stock:
In stock

Description

Tracing Ochre: Changing Perspectives of the Beothuk is an edited and multi- and inter-disciplinary volume by Fiona Polack. Tracing Ochre is a collaborative work of Indigenous and non-Indigenous thinkers who have a shared conviction that the present conceptions of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Beothuk requires redressing. Colonial mentalities about the Beothuk has created problems for Indigenous Peoples there and between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada as a whole. Mi’kmaq, Anishinaabe, and Innu contributors have First Nation affiliations, while contributors with affiliations from the United States, Australia and Scotland are represented. The Mi’kmaq and Beothuk relationship is the focus of Tracing Ochre because of Mi’kmaq public representation. Research on the history of Newfoundland from the first Norse visitors to Johan Cabot’s arrival in 1497 reflect the import of illness; forced relocation away from food sources; genocidal violence, and decimation of the Beothuk. In addition, over-exploitation of the land and sea by colonialists compromised Beothuk food supply and spiritual beliefs. Contemporary politics and agreements between the Federation of Newfoundland Indians and the Canadian government to create a landless First Nation band in 2008 is also discussed in this book. Tracing Ochre has four parts including part one on land, language and memory. Part two reflects myths, bioarchaeology and an interview with Chief Mi’sel Joe. Part three includes Ways of Knowing and addresses Beothuk archaeology, historical sources and historical narrative. In Travelling Tales, part four, the transnational tale of Santu Toney, routes of colonial racism, a peoples’ extinction, and Shanawdithit and Truganini as converging and diverging histories complete the main text. A Coda for the recovery of Indigenous identity is also stated inTracing Ochre. This work Includes a list of illustrations, maps, a list of contributors, and an index.
  

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