Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing pb

University of Toronto PressSKU: 9781487521639

Author:
Sandra D. Styres
Grade Levels:
College, University
Nation:
Iroquois, Maori, Ojibwe
Book Type:
Paperback
Pages:
248
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press

Price:
Sale price$30.95

Description

Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing Indigenous Thought in Education: Philosophies of Iethi’nihsténha Ohwentsia’kékha (Land) is an exploration into some of the shared cross-cultural themes that inform and shape Indigenous thought and Indigenous educational philosophy. These philosophies generate tensions, challenges, and contradictions that can become very tangled and messy when considered within the context of current educational systems that reinforce colonial power relations. Sandra D. Styres shows how Indigenous thought can inform decolonizing approaches in education as well as the possibilities for truly transformative teaching practices. This book offers new pathways for remembering, conceptualizing and understanding these ancient knowledges and philosophies within a twenty-first century educational context. Sandra D. Styres (Mohawk from Six Nations of the Grand River) is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Composed of 13 chapters, this text is written by a scholar who incorporates Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe and Maori (New Zealand) teachings, worldviews, and philosophies that cover the importance of the land, languages, traditional knowledge, trickster, memory, wampum, and identity. This book has a bibliography and a detailed index. Recommended
 A hardcover is also edition is also available.Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing Indigenous Thought in Education: Philosophies of Iethi’nihsténha Ohwentsia’kékha (Land) is an exploration into some of the shared cross-cultural themes that inform and shape Indigenous thought and Indigenous educational philosophy. These philosophies generate tensions, challenges, and contradictions that can become very tangled and messy when considered within the context of current educational systems that reinforce colonial power relations. Sandra D. Styres shows how Indigenous thought can inform decolonizing approaches in education as well as the possibilities for truly transformative teaching practices. This book offers new pathways for remembering, conceptualizing and understanding these ancient knowledges and philosophies within a twenty-first century educational context. Sandra D. Styres (Mohawk from Six Nations of the Grand River) is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Composed of 13 chapters, this text is written by a scholar who incorporates Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe and Maori (New Zealand) teachings, worldviews, and philosophies that cover the importance of the land, languages, traditional knowledge, trickster, memory, wampum, and identity. This book has a bibliography and a detailed index. Recommended
 A hardcover is also edition is also available.

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