The Gift is in the Making-TP FNCR 2015

Highwater PressSKU: 9781553793762

Author:
Simpson, Leanne
Grade Levels:
Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve
Nation:
Ojibwe, Woodland
Book Type:
PB
Pages:
99
Publisher:
Highwater Press
Copyright Data:
2013

Price:
Sale price$22.00

Description

The Gift is in the Making: Anishinaabeg Stories is a unique collection of twenty-one traditional Ojibwe stories retold by storyteller, writer, and spoken-word artist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson from Alderville First Nation. Over the years, the author has told these stories first within her own family and then to larger community members. She has added to her knowledge of the oral tradition and legends from community Elders, language teachers, and authentic print resources. Encouraged by Elders she has written these oral stories featuring Nanabush in her own style. The stories include traditional stories about the origin of Maple Syrup, why the bear has a short tail, the origin of the Big Dipper, how to deal with poison, why the turtle has a hard shell, our treaty with the Hoof Clan (moose, caribou, and deer), the lacrosse game that changed everything, the importance of naming, maintaining balance in the world, the importance of being responsible, origin of speckled trout, wild rice, being oneself, the origin of Lake Winnipeg, the origin of the Lady Slipper, the origin of the Waterlily, and recognizing our gifts. In the introduction, the author notes the importance of stories and explains how they teach individuals and community how to promote, nurture, and maintain good relations, how to function in community, how to relate to the land, how to make collective decisions, and how to be a good person. She also explains storytelling protocol, and the role of language and gender in stories. Simpson acknowledges her sources for all stories, and incorporates key Ojibwe language terms and names in each story. After each story a glossary of terms is explained. This is an importance collection of oral stories meant to be read aloud that offers clear teachings of values and character education, large doses of humour, and a subtle message about Ojibwe Anishinaabeg culture, governance, leadership, decision-making, and diplomacy. This book is highly recommended for secondary level school and public library collections.

You may also like

Recently viewed